All posts tagged: respect

Fit to Sit: Partakers of Endless Glory


Part 2: A Commentary on Psalm 15 Verse 3 – Nor taketh up a reproach against his neighbour. The word cherpah, which we here translate a reproach, comes from charaph, to strip, or make bare, to deprive one of his garments; hence choreph, the winter, because it strips the fields of their clothing, and the trees of their foliage. By this, nature appears to be dishonoured and disgraced. The application is easy: a man, for instance, of a good character is reported to have done something wrong the tale is spread, and the slanderers and backbiters carry it about; and thus the man is stripped of his fair character, of his clothing of righteousness, truth, and honesty. All may be false; or the man, in an hour of the power of darkness, may have been tempted and overcome; may have been wounded in the cloudy and dark day, and deeply mourns his fall before God. Who that has not the heart of a devil would not strive rather to cover than make bare the fault? …

Fit to Sit: Partakers of Endless Glory


Part 1 Commentary on Psalm 15 The questions therefore are, Who can be considered a fit member of the Church of Christ here below? and, Who shall be made partakers of an endless glory? In answer to these questions, the character of what we may term a true Israelite, or a good Christian, is given in the following particulars:- Verse 2. He that walketh uprightly a. He walks perfectly. Who sets God before his eyes, takes his word for the rule of his conduct, considers himself a sojourner on earth, and is continually walking to the kingdom of God. He acts according to the perfections of God’s law; he has respect to all its parts, and feels the weight and importance of all its injunctions. As he is the creature of GOD, he has duties to perform to him. He owes God his heart: May son, give me thy heart; and should love him with all his heart, soul, mind, and strength. This is giving GOD his due. As a member of civil society, he …

Facts Not Opinions


“The way you say something can often be as important as what you are saying. There are ways to discuss criticisms in a judicious manner by qualifying or hedging your language (“It seems that something is the case,” “So-and-so appears to do something,” etc.). You want to avoid inflammatory language that deliberately provokes. Your choice of words matters. For instance, the word failure is more negatively charged than the expression “neglect.” Likewise, to say someone “completely missed” a piece evidence is more negative than noting that he or she “overlooked” or “did not sufficiently consider” some data. There are ways to communicate the same conclusion without overstating your case with an arrogant attitude. Give others the benefit of the doubt; remember the Golden Rule. The virtue of restraint will help you keep the focus on the evidence and avoid overstating your case. This will affect your choice of language and help you steer clear of logical fallacies. Never attribute to other people sinister motives or otherwise speculate about their motives. Even if you think you know what motivated …