All posts tagged: Malcolm Gladwell

The use of Excessive Force: 10-quotes-from-malcolm-gladwell’s-david-and-goliath


In David & Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell offers a paradigm shift in the discussion of how we usually deal with pain, suffering, disadvantages, obstacles, and discrimination. He frames the story of David and Goliath as one of an underdog facing a giant. The cool thing about this dynamic is, “being  an underdog can change people in ways that we often fail to appreciate: it can open doors and create opportunities and educate and enlighten and make possible what might otherwise have seemed unthinkable.” If you’ll allow it, this book will massively overhaul and change the way you look at challenges in your life. In short it a manual for underdogs, misfits and all those who are faced with giants way too strong to conquer. Notable quotes: “Giants are not what we think they are. The same qualities that appear to give them strength are often the sources of great weakness.” “If you bomb a city, you leave behind death and destruction. If you take away a mother or a father, you cause suffering and despair. But one time in ten, out …

The Principle of Legitimacy


I picked up Malcolm Gladwell’s “David and Goliath” tonight and decided to flip through the pages quickly, to see what the owners had underlined. Ron Freise​ and I had a conversation last weekend about something. Well, that thing led him to bring out Malcolm’s book. So I was a bit excited to see what he was talking about. So, in this post I would like to share an excerpt from Malcolm’s book for “underdogs, misfits and all those who want to discover the art of battling giants.” Malcolm writes: When people in authority want the rest of us to behave, it matters – first and foremost – how they behave. This is called the “principle of legitimacy,” and legitimacy is based on three things: First of all, the people who are asked to obey authority have to feel like they have a voice – that if they speak up, they will be heard. Second, the law has to be predictable. There has to be a reasonable expectation that the rules tomorrow are going to be …